Autopsy and Case Reports
https://autopsyandcasereports.org/article/doi/10.4322/acr.2021.403
Autopsy and Case Reports
Clinical Case Report

Adult-onset Still's disease after ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine: a possible association

Laíssa Fiorotti Albertino; Isac Ribeiro Moulaz; Tammer Ferreira Zogheib; Martina Zanotti Carneiro Valentim; Ketty Lysie Libardi Lira Machado

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Abstract

With emergent Sars-Cov-2, a highly transmissive virus that caused millions of deaths worldwide, the development of vaccines became urgent to combat COVID-19. Although rare, important adverse effects had been described in a hypothetical scenario of immune system overstimulation or overreaction. Still’s disease is a rare inflammatory syndrome of unknown etiology. It manifests as a cytokine storm, mainly IL-18 and IL-1β, and presents itself with fever spikes, joint pain, maculopapular evanescent salmon-pink skin rash, and sore throat, among other symptoms. Here, we report a case of a 44-year-old healthy male who developed adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD) with atypical symptoms after both doses of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine with 3 months of dose interval. The medical team suspected Still's disease and started prednisone 1 mg/kg (40mg). The next day the patient showed a marked improvement in articular and chest pains and had no other fever episodes. Therefore, he was discharged to continue the treatment in outpatient care. On the six-month follow-up, the patient was free of complaints, and the progressive corticoid withdrawal plan was already finished.

Keywords

Adenovirus Vaccines, COVID-19 Vaccines, Still's Disease, Adult-Onset

References

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Submitted date:
04/01/2022

Accepted date:
09/26/2022

Publication date:
11/07/2022

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